Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Human Beings and Clothing

Text : Nor Azua Ruslan

[ Dressing Architecture : Colour, Style & Fashion ]
In Relation With Architects and Clothing

Original works submitted to the Manchester School of Architecture for the Bachelor of Architecture dated April 2009. Received a commendation in Summer 2010.

2.1 ] Human Beings and Clothing                                                                                                                      
Human beings are separated by two different gender; men and women. Men and women needed clothes for many reasons. First and foremost, they need clothes to protect their skin and as a way to preserve their modesty. We do not wear clothes purposely just because we are told to do so, but we naturally feel responsible to protect our dignity in a way that we do not exposed our private parts of the body or in other words, not showing any parts of the body which is not suppose to be seen.

Humans—men and women need clothes for showing their performances at a certain time, and will change according to places, events and time. First thing about clothing is to be used to identify a nation culture existed in the world. Japanese girls wear ‘Kimono’ as a national identity at several important events. Indonesian wedding couples will have ‘Java Look—Kebaya’ on their wedding party. All these examples are part of the evolution of the world fashion now. But we will think twice and very selective to what we are going to wear as ‘fashion’. We are not going to wear clothes which are not suitable for our cultures.[2]



FIG.2.2: Japanese Kimono


 FIG.2.3: Javanese Kebaya

                   

Eventough humans need clothes for all the above reason as claimed by Danny, the most important reason is humans need clothes that suite the climate where they lived especially, and shall not wear fashionable clothes that unreasonable to be in some trend. What is matter is to be in comfort clothing.



[2] Danny S. (no date). Unsustainable Building Facades and Fashions in Surabaya, p.68